Poem of the Week: Hollywood Then and Now

Hollywood Then and Now
January 7, 2016

Heroes worth looking up to, rugged and tough like steak,
Standing by their values and knowing the risks they had to take
Against villains who were cunning, deft enough to undermine
The status quo to suit their needs, which they proudly stood behind.
Big-name players whose work has been immortalized over the years,
Whose talents we still remember and will carry on being revered.
Horrors that were frightening on their own without the need
To leap up and startle their victims before making them bleed.
Settings and creatures of fantasy that whisked audiences away
With little to no special effects getting in the way.
Stories that actually made sense down to the most minor plot twist,
Deep enough to intrigue folks, yet simple enough to give their gist,
All of which were fresh and new or at least had their own flavor
And didn’t rely on the brands before them to get folks to savor
What they had to offer. Such was how things used to be.
Nowadays, however, that ain’t what it looks like to me,
For we live in a world where instant gratification’s the thing—
Where Hollywood only cares about the cash a given project brings.
Talent matters not anymore in writing or delivery.
Storytelling now takes a backseat to marketability,
Be it the brand Project X bears or how rude and crude it can be,
Aiming for the lowest common denominator for all to see,
Warming the hearts of those with low standards while churning the guts
Of people with minds of their own and their heads out of their butts
Who can see lazy, offensive trash for what it is beyond the fluff
And go out of their way to support smarter, more sensitive stuff
That might not be as available to the public as a whole
But is much better than Project X might be for the heart, mind, and soul.
Alas, though, it’s not about content, as I’ve said, or quality,
But whether the big wigs can force-feed the likes of your or me
The crap from which they hope to profit, no matter how tacky the taste—
The junk food of entertainment media and, in turn, a waste
Of time, energy, and money on our part to try and enjoy
That takes the easy way out to appeal to all girls and boys.
Sooner or later, I hope things change for the better
So that the folks of tomorrow can experience better weather,
For I can preach about avoiding the bad and supporting the good,
But that alone can but do so much with so little in the neighborhood
As far as money is concerned, although I’m sure that’ll help,
But in the meantime, Hollywood, clean up your act, you whelps!
Stop pouring toxic sludge down our throats and making us call it yogurt.
Give us something new and fresh instead. Would that really hurt?
Don’t give us some excuse, either, like “Nothing’s new these days.”
You’re still not trying with what you’ve been giving us anyway.
If nothing else, at least pass the torch to some new, creative minds
‘Fore you’ve only the most desperate viewers left supporting your behind.
You were good once upon a time—not flawless, but nonetheless,
You’ve fed us but a few good courses recently. Putrid have been the rest,
And only if you improve the consistency of what you release,
The people who’ve been complaining about you won’t shut up in the least.
You owe it to yourself and all the stars you’ve made over the years
To regain what honor you once had before it all disappears,
So shape up, Hollywood! You’ve done better than this before.
Enough of your mindless slacking, then! We can’t take it anymore.

*****

Author Pages: Smashwords.com

                         Amazon.com

                         Amazon.co.uk

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